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Main Designers:
Bernard-Albin GRAS
Bernard Schottlander

DCW éditions
71 rue de la fontaine au roi
75011 Paris
France
sales@dcwe.fr

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Bernard Schottlander - His life

Bernard Schottlander was born in Mainz, Germany in 1924 and moved to England in 1939. After serving with the British Army in India, he learnt to weld and took a course in Sculpture at Leeds College of Art and subsequently – with the help of a bursary – at the Anglo-French art centre in St John’s Wood. Bernard Schottlander described himself as a designer for interiors and a sculptor for exteriors. After several successful years as an industrial designer, Bernard Schottlander chose to concentrate on sculpture. In the late 1950’s he established a workshop in North London where he was ably assisted for many years by George Nash . From 1965 he taught metalwork at St Martins School of Art. In the same year he was part of the group show Six Artists at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London and in the following year (1966) had his fif irst solo show at the Hamilton Galleries, London.

Bernard Schottlander - His work

An admirer of Alexander Calder, in 1951 Schottlander created the Mantis series of lamps. Movement is intrinsic to all of Schottlander’s work: an artist, an engineer and in no small measure a handyman, he devised a clever system of counterweights combined with a series of strong, and flexible metal bars. The shade also is unique of its kind. Like an acrobat suspended in mid-air, it is made from aluminium using spinning and chasing techniques that are a part of the metalworker’s inventory of skills, but to which he has brought his sculptor’s eye to create a helical movement in which the symmetrical and the asymmetrical are in opposition. His lights, with their eternal play between balance and imbalance, reveal some of the secrets of what we mean by ‘solid’ and ‘empty’. And like his idol’s mobiles they appear to defy the laws of gravity. The essential poetry of the object is an invitation to enter a dream world of the most judiciously balanced elegance...
La Lampe Gras, icon of the 20th century

In 1922 Bernard-Albin GRAS designed a series of lamps for use in offices and in industrial environments. The GRAS lamp , as it was subsequently called, was astounding in its simple, robust and yet very ergonomic design. There are neither screws nor welded joints in the basic form. In 1927 the Ravel company purchased the patent and started production of the GRAS lamps.

Bernard- Albin Gras was one of the most innovative designer of the 20th century. The functional esthetic of his lamps and especially the de- sign of details such as those of the arms, stems, brackets and bases were truly original and far ahead of his time. Early on Le Corbusier was seduced by the modern design and user-friendliness of the lamps and became one of Bernard-Albin GRAS’s most enthusiastic supporters using the lamps in his own offices as well as employing them in numerous architectural projects all over the world.

Others such as Robert Mallet-Stevens, Jacques Emile Ruhlmann and Eileen Gray followed this trend as well. Furthermore, such well-know artists as Sonia Delaunay and Georges Braque also used these lamps in their studios. For the first time in history, a lamp was equally popular in professional as well as in residential applications.

Today, the GRAS lamp has become sought after a collector’s item all over the world, most notably in France, in the United States and in Japan. Bernard-Albin Gras’s talented and visionary design has proven to be timeless.
                
Practical Information
   
diito:
62, rue de l'Aurore - 1000 Brussels
p: +32 2 646 16 10
f: +32 2 646 17 10
info@diito.be

diito dansaert:

19, rue des Chartreux - 1000 Brussels
+32 2 502 71 86
info@diito-dansaert.be

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Opening hours:
Monday: closed
Tuesday: 10.30 am > 6.30 pm
Wednesday: 10.30 am > 6.30 pm
Thursday: 10.30 am > 6.30 pm
Friday: 10.30 am > 6.30 pm
Saturday: 10.30 am > 6.30 pm
Sunday: closed
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